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Microchip's Internet Radio Demo Board

Microchip's Internet Radio Demo Board.jpg

The internet radio is a great way to listen to your favorite radio programs without having to be inside the reception range for your local radio station. Also there are many free radio stations on the internet that are not regularly broadcast over the air. This is a close up of the Internet Radio Demonstration board.

The main chip on this board is the PIC18F97J60 which uses integrated MAC and PHY to interface directly to the RJ45 MigJack Ethernet cable connector. Communication over the internet is made easy by having Microchip’s TCP/IP stack programmed on the 97J60 micro controller. The microcontroller’s I/O is used to interface to the OLED graphics LCD display. This display allows for showing the IP address, mode of operation, song and station. Using this phi interface the microcontroller interfaces to the BLFI5BS1011 Mp3 audio decoder. A simple audio head set jack will allow listener to plug into standard head phones or connect to a speaker like this so that multiple people can listen at the same time. The URL website addresses for multiple internet radio stations are preprogrammed on the system. So push buttons will allow the use to scroll through the radio stations and select the desired station. Other push buttons are for volume up and down.

I activated the menu system where I just push a button and you can hear a changed station. It holds up the new station name and also the song name that is playing right now. It will show you the name of the station and then also after a while I can tell you the type of song that is playing. This particular talk radio station doesn’t have anything but if you got to a different station, its Sky FM, that’s the name of the station and Paul Hardcastle is the song I am playing And we can even sort the dance functions such as base boost.

This is just one example of how a simple 8 bit microcontroller with integrated Ethernet and our easy to use TCP/IP stack can take up basic application like a radio and have remote Ethernet connectivity.

The internet radio demo board is targeted for designers who want to learn more about Microchip’s Ethernet solutions and get started quickly with our free TCP/IP stack in a real world application. The board comes pre programmed and ready to play out of the box. You can find all of the related source code, schematics and application notes to build your own internet radio at www.microchip.com/ethernet. App note 1128 specifically describes this internet radio board in detail. You can buy this demo board today through microchipdirect or one of Microchip’s authorized distributors.

Schematics, Diagrams and Firmware here:

TCP/IP Stack for PICmicro

Internet Radio Using OLED Display and MP3 Audio Decoder (Application Note PDF)

Board Connection Diagram (PDF)

Demostration Board (PDF)

... if you don't have the time to diy:

Buy Internet Radio Demo Board from Farnell (24h delivery).

TCP/IP stack code

Extract the tcp/ip stack files and you will see the c source code Smile

If you want to DIY this

If you want to DIY this board, download the datasheet .

Internet Radio Using OLED

TCP/IP Networking: Internet Radio Using OLED Display and MP3 Audio Decoder.

"The focus of this application note is to show how to create a low-cost Internet Radio that connects to SHOUTcast servers and plays MP3 audio. The hardware uses the PIC18F67J60 microcontroller with integrated 10Base-T MAC and PHY and an external MP3 audio decoder. The software uses the standard Microchip TCP/IP Stack with external serial SRAM buffering to ease the streaming of compressed audio data to
the MP3 decoder. Figure 1 shows a picture of the Internet Radio Demonstration Board (DM183033) that is available for purchase on MicrochipDirect or through one of Microchip’s distributors. Figure 2 shows the block diagram for the Internet Radio design used in this
application note."

 PDF

RE: TCI/IP Stack

You are right, it is missing!
This is quite strange, as I remember I did use the stack a while back (3-4 years ago) so it must have existed at some point. I'll do a more thorough search for it, and if I still won't be able to find it, I will ask on the microchip forum.

Regards,
Cristian

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